The power of confiding

I believe there is a real strength, a true power to be reckoned with when admitting one’s own limitations and weaknesses. Letting go of all pretence, with shame and fear cast aside, exposing yourself as vulnerable as you can. Admitting your darkest secrets, the source of your anger, of your sadness, of your inflated or your crippling absence of pride; what troubles you inside. Every single one of us house inner-demons, long and lasting shadows, doubts, fears, regrets, shame in themself. And while their burden can and probably does weigh on your mind, I choose to see a purpose in them. I see a conscience that wants to better itself, the struggle of a person who cares and knows there is a way to improve, to reach a new level of good and/or healthy. Voicing those haunting thoughts can help transform the power they have over you to a power you have for yourself. It is not a shameful and hidden reality you’re trying to avoid anymore; it is a stepping stone to a higher you. Sharing allows you to lift a burden (1), for one but also to sign a sort of moral contract with the person you’re confiding in, as you admitted some of your shortcomings or mistakes and now you owe it to them (but never as much as you owe it to yourself) to change and find a way to be better and most likely happier.

MG

Read more :
(1) Lift a burden > Unburden yourself
The wrong use of sharing > Corrupting transparency